Table of Contents

TITLE II - OF ABSOLUTE OWNERSHIP

 

CHAPTER I - UNIVERSAL PRINCIPLES

Art. 1. Absolute ownership gives a right to enjoy, and to dispose of one's property in the most unlimited manner, provided one does not use the same in a way prohibited by the laws.

Art. 2. No one can be compelled to part with his property, unless by reason of public utility and on consideration of an equitable and previous indemnification.

Art. 3. The right of accession is a consequence of the right of ownership.
The right of accession is the right which the owner of a thing has to what such thing produces, and to what unites itself to the same by a kind of accessory incorporation whether naturally or artificially.

 

CHAPTER II - OF THE RIGHT OF ACCESSION TO WHAT IS PRODUCED BY THE THING

Art. 4. All that is produced by a thing whether moveable or immoveable belongs to the owner of that thing.
Such are the fruits of the earth whether they grow spontaneously or have been cultivated;
Civil rights;
Children of slaves, and the young of cattle.

Art. 5. The fruits produced by the thing belong to its owner, although they may have been produced by the labors, work and seeds, sown by a third person, on the owner's reimbursing said person his expences.

Art. 6. The produce of the thing does not belong to the simple possessor, and must be returned with the thing to the owner who claims the same, except in case of the detainer's having possessed it bona fide.

Art. 7. The possessor bona fide, is he who had possessed as owner, in virtue of a transferable title of property, but erroneous and defective, whose defects however he was ignorant of.
He ceases to be a bona fide possessor from the moment those defects are made known to him.




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